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Prowse House 1912

Prowse House 1912

7189 Maitland Avenue

The first owner of this house was Robert W. Prowse. The boxy form of the house is enlivened by the use of an insert corner porch and a second floor balcony; there is also a projecting bay to the south. The siding changes from lapped wood at ground level to cedar shingles at the second floor.

Photo by Ted Sauriol 2013

(Page 44  ,The District of Chilliwack Heritage Inventory, Chilliwack Heritage Advisory Committee, 1991, Chilliwack Museum and Archives reference collection)

Gillanders House

GILLANDERS HOUSE 1911

“This is one of the distinctive concrete block houses built by contractor Ernest Hill just before the First World War. Molded concrete blocks became a popular building material; they were relatively inexpensive, decorative, and fireproof alternative to wood frame construction. Similar to a number of other such houses, there is a square floor plan, a high hipped roof, and a front verandah with classical columns.  It was built for Albert Gillanders, who had moved to the area in 1873, at the age of 18.”

(Page 15,The District of Chilliwack Heritage Inventory, Chilliwack Heritage Advisory Committee, 1991, Chilliwack Museum and Archives reference collection)

Photo taken in January 2014 by Ted Sauriol

 

 

CARMICHAEL HOUSE 1911

“Maude Carmichael was the daughter of Chilliwack’s  first mayor, Sam Cawley. In January 1911, she married John Carmichael who was killed early in the first World War; Maude sold this house around 1920. Built in the Craftsman style the side gable roof is balanced by a front gable dormer and a inset entry porch; typical of the style are the notch vergeboards and the triangular eve brackets.”

(Page 16,The District of Chilliwack Heritage Inventory, Chilliwack Heritage Advisory Committee, 1991, Chilliwack Museum and Archives reference collection)

Photograph taken in February 2014 by Ted Sauriol

 

PARKER HOUSE 1911

“Alfred Parker was born in Cornwall in 1870, and arrived in 1885. He established a 80 acre dairy farm here; in 1910 he sold 9 acres to the B.C. Electrical Railroad Company , the proceeds allowed him to build a large barn. The house was built for Parker and his wife Alice by John Martin, a carpenter who arrived from Ontario in 1911; the square floor plan and hip roof with symmetrical hip dormers, are very similar to Martin,s own home, which survives in altered condition at 51693 Old Yale Road”

(Page 16,The District of Chilliwack Heritage Inventory, Chilliwack Heritage Advisory Committee, 1991, Chilliwack Museum and Archives reference collection)

Photographed February 2014 By Ted Sauriol

 

 

WALKER HOUSE 1909-1911

“This was the first concrete block house to be built in Chilliwack. Starting in 1909 William Walker began to manufacture the blocks, then hired Ernest Mill to assemble them. This was the prototype for a number of others that Hill went on to build. The Chilliwack Progress of February 28, 1912 reported “Walker… has the satisfaction… of knowing his work is a permanency and should last many decades after he has ceased to need it”. In the 1940’s the house was owned by the Count and Countess Van Rechteren, who named it ” Zoeterwoude” after a village in Holland; Princess Juliana was one of the visitors to the house during the Second World War. The house was designated a Heritage House in 1989.

(Page 15,The District of Chilliwack Heritage Inventory, Chilliwack Heritage Advisory Committee, 1991, Chilliwack Museum and Archives reference collection)

Photograph by Ted Sauriol  February 2014

 

BAILEY HOUSE CIRCA 1885

“James Bailey was born in Ontario in 1878, settling in Chilliwack in 1877. He worked for Mr.Reece for eight years, and at the same time was felling and hewing the trees on his own land; this gave him enough lumber to construct four houses, including the Walker House (47795 McGuire Road) , and this his own home. Bailey sold his farm to John McIntyre in 1902. Behind the latter vynil siding are the original square notched log walls of Bailey’s house. ”

(Page 14,The District of Chilliwack Heritage Inventory, Chilliwack Heritage Advisory Committee, 1991, Chilliwack Museum and Archives reference collection)

Photo taken in February 2014

 

HENDERSON HOUSE 1909

“This was the residence of R.A. Henderson, the City Engineer; he moved here from the Knight Block in 1909. Built by contractor D.M. Day, it was owned by Josephine E. Thomas. It is distinguished by a cross-gambrel roof, and has survived in virtually its original form.”

(Page 28,The District of Chilliwack Heritage Inventory, Chilliwack Heritage Advisory Committee, 1991, Chilliwack Museum and Archives reference collection)

http://issuu.com/chilliwackmuseum/docs/1991_chilliwack_heritage_house_inventory/1

Photo taken January 30, 2014 by Ted Sauriol

R.A Henderson House 46035 Gore Ave. 1909

BRADSHAW HOUSE 1891

“William Bradshaw a carpenter, built this house for himself in 1891. It is an excellent example of exuberant ornamentation that was popular in the late Victorian era, here rendered in wood. Four different type of shingles are used to provide surface texturing, in addition to decoration brackets and struts, and vertical Stick strapping. The massing of the house is complex, with a projecting front gable cantilevered over a semi-octagonal bay, and jerked in headed roof.”

(Chilliwack Archives, Chilliwack Heritage Inventory)

http://issuu.com/chilliwackmuseum/docs/1991_chilliwack_heritage_house_inventory/1

This photograph taken in January 2014 by Ted Sauriol

Benjamin S Bradshaw House 1891 46001 Victoria Ave.

Clark House 1915

This Imposing farmhouse, built for A.D Clark, is located at the intersection of Lickman and Sumas Central Roads. The large front yard retains a number of early plantings, and there are orchard remnants adjacent. A large open front verendah provides a gracious entry; the house has been very well maintained.  (Chilliwack Archives, Chilliwack Heritage Inventory).

This picture was taken in January 2014 by Ted Sauriol

http://issuu.com/chilliwackmuseum/docs/1991_chilliwack_heritage_house_inventory/1

Clark House 1915 7248 Lickman Road

KEITH HOUSE 1911

James Hebert Keith was born in 1865 in Havelock, New Brunswick; he married Laura Alma Bonter in Chilliwack in 1893. They established this dairy farm on Lickman Road; James built this prominent house for them and their six children to designs conceived by Alma. The house and farm were later owned by W.T. Richardson, Council member for 31 years and a long time member of the Canadian Guernsey Breeders Association. The old B.C. Electric Railway tracks run adjacent to this tall, symmetrical Foursquare house. (Chilliwack Archives, Chilliwack Heritage Inventory).

I had the pleasure of talking to the owner of this home. She came out and spoke to me when she saw me photograph her home. She told me when she was younger she would drive by this home and did not like it much. Its strange how things go in life huh. She now owns it. She explained to me that that her family had made a few changes to the upstairs of the home to accommodate their needs, but it was not dramatic. This picture was taken on January 29, 2014.

Keith House 6112 Lickman 1909-1912